Jesuit Fordham University: “We categorically condemn the vile slander that the crisis in the Catholic church is due to the presence of gay men.”

Jesuit Fordham University: “We categorically condemn the vile slander that the crisis in the Catholic church is due to the presence of gay men.”

Joseph Sciambra – September 7th, 2018
On September, 5, 2018 Dr. Patrick Hornbeck, Chair of Fordham Theology and Fr. Bryan
Massingale, the James and Nancy Buckman Chair in Applied Christian Ethics, released a
statement concerning the current sex abuse crisis in the Catholic Church. Here is an excerpt:

 

The efforts by some influential persons to lay responsibility for the church’s situation upon gay priests and our society’s growing acceptance of same-sex orientations and relationships can occasion feelings of anger, betrayal, and perhaps even shame…First, we categorically condemn the vile slander that the crisis in the Catholic church is due to the presence of gay men. It reflects one of the most pernicious and deeply rooted stereotypes of gay persons, that of the sexual molester and child predator. It is a prejudice rooted in ignorance, fear, and/or hate. It negates the witness of many gay men who serve as priests with dedication and even distinction. It minimizes or even ignores the pain endured by female survivors of clerical abuse. Moreover, the alleged connection between pedophilia and homosexuality is unsupported by the Catholic church’s own commissioned research. The crisis facing the Catholic church is not one of sexual orientation. It is instead a crisis of sexual violence, systemic dishonesty, and episcopal malfeasance.

According to the USCCB commissioned “John Jay Report,” the majority (81%) of priest sex abuse victims were male; and 78% if the male victims were between the ages of 11-17.

Jesuit-run Fordham University in New York City is perhaps the most gay-affirmative “Catholic” college in the United States.

In 2016, the pro-gay marriage documentary film “Edie and Thea: A Very Long Engagement” was screened at Fordham during an event co-sponsored by the Department of Theology, Department of Communication and Media Studies, and the Office of Multicultural Affairs. At that event, Edie Windsor, one of the subjects of the film was the special quest.

In 2017, for the first time, a contingent from Fordham marched in the New York City “Pride” Parade.

Also, in 2017, Jesuit James Martin too part in a “conversation” with Patrick Hornbeck regarding homosexuality and the Catholic Church during which Martin discussed a friend who left his religious order to begin a homosexual relationship; Martin said:

“He came out and has been with his partner for 20 years…Mark has cared for him for, I think, 15–20 years now. And one of the questions I would like the institutional Church to reflect on is: ‘Is this not love?’”

He added, “I do not understand how a person could say the following things: This is not love, this is a lesser love, they should be apart, they should have never met, they should never be together.”

In 2018, Out at St. Paul, the Catholic LGBT ministry located at St. Paul the Apostle Church in New York City, hosted a presentation entitled “Countertraditions to Adam and Eve: Relationships in the O.T.”

The presenter, Karina Martin Hogan, is a faculty member of Fordham’s “Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.” The department funds the annual Fordham production of “The Vagina Monologues.” In 2014, Hogan offered her opinion to “The Observer,” the official student newspaper of Fordham University, concerning the firing of same-sex married individuals from Catholic institutions. According to the article:

…Hogan questions the general procreative arguments used by Catholics, and other religions, in regards to same-sex marriage.

“Does that mean that marriages that aren’t blessed with children, marriages that are infertile or people marrying when they are too old to have children or any other reason, does that make them any less valid as marriages if they marry in the Catholic Church?” she posited.

Hogan also pointed out that many gay couples marry because they want to have children, whether through adoption, surrogacy or other forms of procreation without the children being biological offspring of both parents.

“So I don’t think procreation works either way for defining marriage,” she said. “In fact, to get biblical for a minute,” Hogan continued, “the story in Genesis 2 that explains why people get married… doesn’t actually say anything about procreation.” Instead, Hogan clarified that Adam and Eve become one flesh, and while it “seems to be implying sex, it never says ‘and then they will have lots of babies.’”

In 2017, Hogan signed a “Statement by Feminist Scholars,” which declared, among other things, that: “We must protect reproductive justice…”

Fordham is also home to the campus PRIDE Alliance and the Rainbow Alliance. 

Dr. Patrick Hornbeck is currently Associate Professor and Chair of Fordham’s Department of Theology. In 2015, he married his same-sex partner at St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church in New York City.

During a 2014 event with James Martin, Hornbeck and Martin discussed “the law of gradualism” at it relates to possible Catholic pastoral practices with LGBT men and women. He explained:

One of the things I was taught, I’ve been with Jesuits since high school, there is this Ignatian pedagogical paradigm, a teaching paradigm, that starts out with where is the student. And the goal is not to say: “Oh bad student, look at the nasty place you are in. Let me try to help you out of it.” But let me understand who you are in this place, let me see God in you in that place.

During a 2017 address titled “Pope Francis –A Student of St Ignatius,” regarding “the search for God in all things,” Hornbeck said:

…How exactly is it that God is working in the lives of those whose marriages have been broken or in the lives of same-sex couples and the families that they create? A stricter interpretation of Canon Law or of sexual ethics might urge us to the conclusion that nothing good can come out of these relationships – these divorced and remarried relationships, these same-sex relationships, something along the lines of no good fruit from the poisoned tree, but Francis, while not undertaking any formal doctrinal changes has urged the clergy to make allowances in pastoral practice for those whom he says live in quote/unquote “irregular situations.”

Bryan Massingale is currently a professor of Theology at Fordham. In 2017, Massingale spoke at New Ways Ministry’s Eight National Symposium. In 1999, the co-founders of New Ways Ministry were officially silenced by the Vatican. In 2010, Cardinal Francis George, O.M.I, Archbishop of Chicago and then-President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, issued the following statement on the status of the organization “New Ways Ministry;” here is an excerpt:

…I wish to make it clear that, like other groups that claim to be Catholic but deny central aspects of Church teaching, New Ways Ministry has no approval or recognition from the Catholic Church and that they cannot speak on behalf of the Catholic faithful in the United States.

On March 16, 2018, Massingale was a panel presenter at the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress for a workshop entitled “Transgender in Our Schools: One Bread, One Body.” On the topic of transgenderism and the Catholic Church, Massingale stated that the Church is in “a period of discernment:”

So, what do we do when we don’t understand? It means the Catholic Church is all over the board on this. It means if you go to Holy Rosary College, and you transition as a student, they will welcome you with open arms, and the campus ministry will accept you and they will provide housing and accommodations. Or you go to Saint Kundykunda’s, try not to pick anybody…and you transition, you can be expelled. Because that’s the kind of place we are at right now because the Catholic Church is in a period of discernment as we are trying to understand what we don’t understand.

Concerning a change in Church teaching with regards to homosexual activity, in comparison to the process which took place in the Episcopal, Presbyterian, Methodist, and Lutheran churches, Massingale argued:

They all went through a messy period marked by a divergence of opinion and open disagreement on approach…We can’t expect the Catholic experience to be any different. The differences we see among official leaders are part of a normal process of coming to a different place.

He continued:

I think this is a call for us as Catholics to accept the reality that we live in a church that’s in the midst of hesitant but real change and development. How do we help our people to understand that this isn’t something that’s entirely new in church history?

He would later add:

We’re in this transitional time when we’re moving out of one paradigm of understanding human sexuality and into another. That’s part of the mess we’re in, but it is our faith as Catholics that this mess contains the ground for new life and new birth.

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7 comments on “Jesuit Fordham University: “We categorically condemn the vile slander that the crisis in the Catholic church is due to the presence of gay men.”

  1. In Their Own Words: Homosexuality, the Catholic Church, and the Society of Jesus

    Joseph Sciembra – September 4th, 2018

    Fred Daley – Pastor in the Diocese of Syracuse; he publicly “came out” as “gay” in 2004.

    “While on a retreat, I shared the truth about my sexuality for the first time with the Jesuit priest assigned as my spiritual director. I prayed that he would help me get back on track. I wanted to learn how to repress these impure thoughts. Instead, Father Paul explained that my sexual orientation is part of who God created me to be. I was and am wholly loved by God.”

    Ben Brenkert – Former “gay” seminarian with the Jesuits.

    “…I was open and transparent about my sexual orientation from the beginning. Before I committed, I talked to my vocation director. He was a gay Jesuit; he assured me I’d be welcomed into the Society of Jesus, that I wouldn’t have to go back into the closet. I met other gay Jesuits who told me the same.”

    Patrick Hornbeck – Associate Professor and Chair of Fordham’s Department of Theology. In 2015, he married his same-sex partner at St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church in New York City.

    “One of the things I was taught, I’ve been with Jesuits since high school, there is this Ignatian pedagogical paradigm, a teaching paradigm, that starts out with where is the student. And the goal is not to say: ‘Oh bad student, look at the nasty place you are in. Let me try to help you out of it.’ But let me understand who you are in this place, let me see God in you in that place.”

    “A stricter interpretation of Canon Law or of sexual ethics might urge us to the conclusion that nothing good can come out of these relationships – these divorced and remarried relationships, these same-sex relationships, something along the lines of no good fruit from the poisoned tree, but [Pope] Francis, while not undertaking any formal doctrinal changes has urged the clergy to make allowances in pastoral practice for those whom he says live in quote/unquote ‘irregular situations.’”

    Martha Plascencia – Leader of LGBT Parent Support Group; interviewed by the Jesuit-run “IN Network.”

    “The language in the Catechism has to change. That word ‘intrinsically disordered,’ my son is not intrinsically disordered. And the bullets from the Catechism, they can harm a lot of children – I mean to the extent of suicide.”

    Patrick Conroy, S. J. – Jesuit Chaplain to the U.S. House of Representatives.

    “What hope does that ever give for a gay or lesbian person who desires just as a heterosexual person desires to commit their life to someone in whom as Catholics they have found the presence of the love of Christ, the presence of the meaning of their life in that person. Where to go with that is the dead end.”

    Donal Godfrey, S.J. – Associate Director for Faculty and Staff Spirituality at the University of San Francisco.

    “As a church we need to accept that family goes beyond traditional lines. I don’t expect the teachings to jump to acceptance in one day, it will take decades. In the meantime we need to accept people pastorally as they are and where they are. For now, this would be sufficient. Later the teachings will catch up and evolve.”

    Dennis J. Yesalonia, S.J. – Pastor at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in New York City.

    “For reasons unique to each person, our LGBTQ parishioners are firmly committed to being Catholics, despite how they are characterized by the official teaching of the church. They are nonetheless buoyed by their hope that the church’s teaching will change…They yearn to be true to who they are, created out of love by God as gay, as lesbian, as bisexual, as transgendered, or as questioning of their identity.”

    The Editors of The Jesuit Post –

    “Many of us know people in same sex relationships of authentic love. We have come to understand that love, fidelity, and mutual commitment are worth being grateful for, regardless of the genders involved. We know the real hardships our loved ones suffer on account of not having the same rights as their heterosexual counterparts – whether through actual discrimination on the part of the government or through internalized perceptions of inferiority and worthlessness. We can, and do, celebrate the relief and affirmation they are experiencing right now.”

    Professors Todd A. Salzman and Michael G. Lawler – Chair of the Department of Theology at Jesuit Creighton University; professor emeritus.

    “Francis limits his consideration of irregular situations to couples who are divorced and remarried without an annulment and couples who are cohabiting, but his analysis applies also to other situations considered gravely sinful, such as a same-sex union. Factors may exist in all irregular situations which limit “deliberate consent” and the ability to make a fully informed moral decision (Amoris Laetitia, 301).”

    John D. Whitney, S.J. – Pastor at St. Joseph Catholic Parish in Seattle; former Provincial for the Society of Jesus, Oregon Province.

    “[Saint] Paul, a man of his times and circumstances, was clearly connecting the idolatry of the pagan world to the sexual behaviors that often accompanied it. Ritualized homosexuality and pederasty are significantly different from the loving and mutually chosen relationships of many committed gays and lesbians… But, what we see today is something else, something not so easily answered by St. Paul’s words or those of Leviticus.”

    Bryan Massingale – Professor of Theology at Fordham University.

    “We’re in this transitional time when we’re moving out of one paradigm of understanding human sexuality and into another. That’s part of the mess we’re in, but it is our faith as Catholics that this mess contains the ground for new life and new birth.”

    James Martin, S.J. – Author and editor-at-large of the Jesuit magazine “America.”

    “I’m no theologian, but I would say that some of the language used in the catechism on that topic needs to be updated, given what we know now about homosexuality. Earlier, for example, the catechism says that the homosexual orientation is itself “objectively disordered.” But, as I say in the book, saying that one of the deepest parts of a person — the part that gives and receives love — is disordered is needlessly hurtful. A few weeks ago, I met an Italian theologian who suggested the phrase “differently ordered” might convey that idea more pastorally.”

    Russell Pollitt, S.J. – The Jesuit Institute of South Africa

    “The kind of language, for example, which is used in official texts of the Church powerfully shapes perceptions, attitudes and actions. After all, isn’t that what religious teaching strives to do – shape perceptions, attitudes and actions – hopefully for the good? Phrases such as ‘objectively disordered’ are not helpful… Bad religion, which includes bad religious language, is an assault rifle – and it is used often. Some pulpits are assault rifles.”

    Andy Buechel – Professor at Jesuit Xavier University in Cincinnati.

    “…God became human that humans might become God. Our deepest desire is to participate fully in the erotic life of God, to be immersed so totally in love that the Divine Life and our own become the same…The encounters with the resurrected Lord intensify the limitations and reductions of modern conceptions of sexual difference and sexual orientation, limitations first seen at the transfiguration. Jesus’ body is not only queer in its fluidity, openness, and excess; it is queer by how it relates to other bodies erotically, drawing them towards the Divine.”

    Thomas Reese, S.J. – Author and a former editor-in-chief of “America.”

    “I have never bought the argument that gay marriage is a threat to families. Legalizing gay marriage is not going to cause millions of people in heterosexual marriages to suddenly decide to leave their spouses for a same-sex partner. It could be argued that gay marriage might help heterosexual marriages. For example, in an apartment building filled with unmarried couples in New York City, the gays who get married may inspire the heterosexuals to do the same thing.”

    Michael O’Loughlin – National Correspondent for “America.”

    “As a Catholic, who happens to work in the church, and who writes extensively about the church, and who is also gay, I am fairly desensitized to the veiled bigotry employed by so many Catholic leaders. Sure, the cardinals and bishops who seem obsessed with issues of homosexuality usually begin their statements recalling the Catechism of the Catholic Church that reminds us all people are to be treated with dignity. But in the next breath, their words turn to sin, disorder, unnaturalness, and general judgment and condemnation. Under Pope Benedict XVI, combined with rapid advancements for LGBT people in the West, the church’s attitude and language toward gay people reached a nadir.”

    Robert Carter, S.J. – Founding member the National Gay Task Force.

    “Since Jesus had table fellowship with social outcasts and sinners, those rejected by the religious establishment of his time, I consider myself to have been most fully a Jesuit, a ‘companion of Jesus,’ when I came out publicly as a gay man, one of the social rejects of my time. It was only by our coming out that society’s negative stereotypes would be overcome and we would gain social acceptance.”

    John J. McNeill, S.J. – Author and co-founder of the dissident Catholic LGBT ministry Dignity.

    “Since most gay people experience their homosexual orientation as a part of creation, if they accept this Church teaching, they must see God as sadistically creating them with an intrinsic orientation to evil. Most gays would prefer to see the Church teaching as wrong, rather than believe God is sadistic.”

  2. “Moreover, the alleged connection between pedophilia and homosexuality is unsupported by the Catholic church’s own commissioned research. The crisis facing the Catholic church is not one of sexual orientation. It is instead a crisis of sexual violence, systemic dishonesty, and episcopal malfeasance. ”
    /
    First of all, the research in question was not commissioned by the Catholic Church, but by a ragged lot of perverted homo bishops and priests, and their enablers. Are you *really* going to take seriously research into the causes of crimes, when that research was commissioned by the criminals? See this: angelqueen.org/2018/09/03/just-the-facts/
    /
    The so-called expert Thomas Plante, for instance, is just a plant; a shill for the Homo Mafia.
    Here’s an excerpt from www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/do-the-right-thing/201808/separating-facts-about-clergy-abuse-fiction:
    “Since about 80 percent of the victims of clergy sexual abuse are male, many wish to blame the clergy abuse problem in the Church on homosexual priests. While research does suggest that the percentage of Catholic priests who are homosexual is much higher than found in the general population, we know that sexual orientation is not a risk factor for pedophilia. Homosexual men may be sexually attracted to other men but not to children. Research has found that most of the sexual abuse perpetrators didn’t consider themselves homosexual at all but were “situational generalists” (i.e., they abused whoever they had access to and control over, boys or girls).”
    /
    How can anyone take seriously a guy who is still going on about “pedophilia”, and using it for a catch-all term for sex abuse, when people have known for decades that the great majority of abuse cases are instances of ephebophilia; the abuse of adolescents?
    As for “situational generalists”, that’s just a filthy euphemism for a bisexual predator who takes advantage of any opportunity to destroy an innocent soul.
    /
    The bottom line is this: If you have sex with those of your own gender, you are homosexual, period. If you have sex with persons of either gender, you are bisexual, and bisexuality includes homosexuality.
    If you have sex with anyone who is underage, you are a corrupter of youth.
    Now homosexuality and bisexuality are perversions.
    One perversion, once surrendered to, leads to more perversions, and greater ones.
    /
    THAT is why the sex abuse problem is a homosexual problem. Homosexuality is a deep perversion, which naturally leads to the even deeper perversion of the corruption of youth.
    Heterosexual perversion can and does also lead to abuse, of those of the opposite sex, but that perversion is not as deep, and that’s why the great minority of abuse cases are heterosexual.
    /
    We don’t need your ****** sexual pop psychology.
    We have the Catholic Faith, and common sense, both of which Novus Ordites lack.

  3. You fellows probably all know that I spend most of my time posting on the novenas with Cindy. Well, I’m not blind and I know full well what the leading news item has been for weeks now. How I wish this subject would become a BLEEP classification. I can barely remember when sede-ism was a daily horror. What do you think, Tom? I’m getting pretty disgusted with this scandalous matter. Or would making it a BLEEP make your job of compiling the news too difficult?

    • That’s up to Serv(itium).

      He has a post in draft from mid-August entitled “Should I still be running this Catholic forum?” which he has not yet published.

      I try to avoid graphic reports of such activties (abusive and consensual) and concentrate on the issues, which are developing fast and furiously.

      • Goodness, I wouldn’t want John to shut us down over this matter! I would miss all of you guys so horrendously. You’ve been my friends for over a decade. We are not the problem- it’s what’s out there. Maybe you should just provide links to the nasty subjects so folks could read it over at the places they originated. Or maybe just pick the “News” option and not the “Home” or “General” option when you are going to publish. If we ended, then the sickos would have won.

  4. Well, Fordham, I suspect that the majority of bishops are with you , as least to the point of believing that homos can be normal members of society, not detrimental to society, and likewise they can be priests as well. This is the focus of the error. It has only one outcome: us or them. It spells the end of society as we know it.

    A point of illustration: Conservative Breitbart News tried to carve out a gay-is-OK section of their coverage, headed by an admitted queer, Milo Yiannopoulos. They gave him his own lavender banner and sent him to be an in-your-face counter to leftists. This shtick blew up in Breitbart’s face when Milo admitted exactly what mainstream homos do: they “groom” boys. From Gay is OK? Breitbart.com’s once beloved pet fag Milo: Older men “help provide love” to younger boys; Admits being abused by a priest:

    “In the homosexual world, particularly, some of those relationships between younger boys and older men — the sort of ‘coming of age’ relationship — those relationships in which those older men help those young boys discover who they are and give them security and safety and provide them with love and a reliable, sort of rock, where they can’t speak to their parents.” -Milo

    If you’re OK with homos, then you have to accept that an overwhelming number of them are created by being molested by an older male. This is exactly what the “homo subculture” in the Church is about. The predators have crops of young men cooped up in seminaries having their masculinity drained by NovusOrdo instruction. The wolves get to hand-pick their charges, toy with their minds, treat them with flattery, some porn, etc.,
    and eventually get them to play pee-pee with them, etc. etc. Or they just plain corner and rape them. The result is the same: the young man’s shame overwhelms him, but he sublimates it, and eventually inverts it into the positive-sounding drivel you just read from Milo.

    All you Catholics who are OK with having “gays” around: you must admit that you approve of what Milo called “the homosexual world” wherein adult males bugger teen boys. If, on the other hand, you’re not OK with that, then you cannot be OK with “gays.”

  5. Zuzu, your point is well taken with respect to certain expressions which could be rephrased. As the crisis now erupting will likely only worsen and cause even more indignation I will, as one overmuch given to incendiary prolixity, try to remember to tone it down.

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