‘God made you gay’: Did Pope Francis just tell the lie of the century?

‘God made you gay’: Did Pope Francis just tell the lie of the century?

Related image

ROME, May 21, 2018 (LifeSiteNews) – Pope Francis’ alleged infelicitous counsel to a gay man, if not retracted, risks slowly killing the same-sex attracted by affirming them to death.

According to multiple reports, a gay man who visited Pope Francis at the Vatican last week is alleging the Pope told him, “God made you gay.” The allegation comes from Juan Carlos Cruz, one of the child victims of sexual abuse by Chilean clergy. The comment has quickly coiled around the world.

Such a strong remark, from such a seat of moral and spiritual authority, would surely tighten the already strong grip of LGBT ideology.

In this alleged comment, the Jesuit Pontiff made a giant leap from his already confounding, impenetrable, “Who am I to judge?” suggesting to the world that the Church is treading down a path to justifying LGBT identity and activity as fully normal. Such a path would be impossible for the Church of Christ.

The Vatican press office’s Cristina Ravenda told LifeSiteNews, “The Vatican does not comment on private conversations of the Pope.” Given the seriousness, we would expect Pope Francis to personally correct the record with haste if Cruz got the quote wrong.

But unfortunately, Cruz’s claim is not far-fetched.

Over the course of his pontificate, Pope Francis has given indications that he is not concerned with addressing homosexual activity as inherently disordered and intrinsically evil.  Quite the contrary: Not long ago he signalled support for legal recognition of same-sex unions.  He has welcomed a former male student and his boyfriend to the Vatican’s U.S. Embassy. And a French priest recently said in a televised interview that Pope Francis approved of his blessing of homosexual couples.

According to Catholic philosopher Dr. Josef Seifert, the Pope’s apostolic exhortation, Amoris Laetitia, could be used to overturn Catholic teaching against contracepted sex and homosexuality.

Image
The Pope’s alleged remark was the top story on the Drudge Report on Monday.

The souls of roughly two percent of the world’s population are now precariously balanced on the tip of the cupola atop St. Peter’s Basilica, waiting to see if the Church will save them through the telling of hard truths, or condemn them through affirmation.

The Pope’s words seem to belong to a new form of liberation theology––gay liberation theology––through which those who experience same-sex attraction are affirmed in their impulses, rather than encouraged to conform their lives to the Gospel.

More significantly, the embrace of a harmful self-identity as ‘gay’ or ‘lesbian’ in the core of their beings is not being rejected by St. Peter’s successor.  Instead, if Cruz’s report holds up, we have a Pope who now simply asserts: “God made you gay.”

The Pontiff’s words are unsupported by the magisterium of the Church.

He is presenting a gospel foreign to Catholic ears.  Even to many same-sex attracted Catholics like me, it is not only foreign; it rings wholly untrue.

Many of us who experience same-sex attraction and remain chaste are troubled by the Pope’s departure from both Church teaching and natural law, through which we have freedom and life.   In seeking conjugal, complementary marriage rather than anti-conjugal, anti-complementary mono-gendered relationships, we seek nothing more than to fit in with the entire universe, to be part of the wonderful ecosystem of humanity and all of nature. Non-conjugal, non-complementary sexual relationships are a synthetic lifestyle, at odds with nature and the cosmos.

In 2013, the premiere LGBT publication, The Advocatenamed Pope Francis “Person of the Year,” for asking, “If someone is gay and seeks the Lord with goodwill, who am I to judge?”

Image

The Advocate editor’s explanation of their choice reveals the grave danger to which Pope Francis’ problematic question has exposed the Church:

The most influential person of 2013 doesn’t come from our ongoing legal conflict but instead from our spiritual one — successes from which are harder to define. There has not been any vote cast or ruling issued, and still a significant and unprecedented shift took place this year in how LGBT people are considered by one of the world’s largest faith communities.

Pope Francis is leader of 1.2 billion Roman Catholics all over the world. There are three times as many Catholics in the world than there are citizens in the United States. Like it or not, what he says makes a difference. Sure, we all know Catholics who fudge on the religion’s rules about morality. There’s a lot of disagreement, about the role of women, about contraception, and more. But none of that should lead us to underestimate any pope’s capacity for persuading hearts and minds in opening to LGBT people, and not only in the U.S. but globally.

The purveyors of LGBT ideology are grateful for this Pope, and have looked to him since 2013 to do their work for them, to knock down the remaining walls which have prevented the infiltration of their ideology into the Church.  The article continues:

The remaining holdouts for LGBT acceptance in religion, the ones who block progress in the work left to do, will more likely be persuaded by a figure they know. In the same way that President Obama transformed politics with his evolution on LGBT civil rights, a change from the pope could have a lasting effect on religion.

They despised a beloved saint, John Paul II, while he was Pope as they did Pope Benedict XVI.  But the LGBT world clearly loves the man who currently occupies the chair of St. Peter.

Pope Francis’s stark change in rhetoric from his two predecessors — both who were at one time or another among The Advocate’s annual Phobie Awards — makes what he’s done in 2013 all the more daring. First there’s Pope John Paul II, who gay rights activists protested during a highly publicized visit to the United States in 1987 because of what had become known as the “Rat Letter” — an unprecedented damning of homosexuality as “intrinsically evil.” It was written by one of his cardinals, Joseph Ratzinger, who went on to become Pope Benedict XVI. Since 1978, one of those two men had commanded the influence of the Vatican — until this year.

The Advocate has already happily reported the Pope’s audacious untruth, “God made you gay.”  He may well again be chosen as their ‘Person of the Year’ in 2018.

The LGBT world applauded Pope Francis’ recruitment of fellow Jesuit, pro-LGBT Fr. James Martin as a communications consultant to the Holy See’s Secretariat for Communications.

If the Pope’s alleged words to Juan Carlos Cruz––the victim of clergy child abuse––are confirmed to be true, the Pope will have abandoned the world’s same-sex attracted, leaving them adrift in the world.

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
http://angelqueen.org/2018/05/21/god-made-you-gay-did-pope-francis-just-tell-the-lie-of-the-century/
Get AQ Email Updates
AQ RSS Feed

5 comments on “‘God made you gay’: Did Pope Francis just tell the lie of the century?

  1. Great spiritual writers have never failed to condemn with particular vehemence the sin upon which even demons refuse to look, its baseness is so repulsive even to them.
    /
    Aquinas, while perfectly in agreement in his own detestation of the unnatural vice, nevertheless defines heresy as the single greatest crime a man can commit.
    The reason is that heresy defies God to His Face, literally taking an axe to the root of the tree, Revelation itself, making impossible all growth and fruition in the spiritual life.
    /
    Thus, whereas repentant sodomites and even heterosexual practitioners of the same wicked acts within marriage can, by sacramental absolution and the firm resolve to sin no more, regain hope for salvation, those who refuse to quit their heretical vice, under pretext of liberty of religion, false ecumaniacal “charity”, etc. risk a more severe Hell than sods and those promoting marital sodomite acts.

  2. I have previously read the item and put up the link prior to re-reading it. It does seem that the link, informative as it is by highlighting key points made in the full booklet is, however, an excerpt.

  3. [Church Militant’s reaction to FrankenPope’s “God made you gay [which for me is OK]” quote: No big deal! – I enjoy making doggerel verses with quotes or issues such as this! – AQ Tom]
    /
    The CM article headline (“LGBT WORLD REACTS TO POPE’S ‘GAY’ REMARKS“) and most of its content are OK, but the subtitle (“Pope’s private comments carry no magisterial weight”) while technically correct, misses the point!
    /
    The following quote from the article about the Vatican’s policy could be applied to CM’s attitude:
    /
    In keeping with its policy not to comment on Pope Francis’ private remarks, the Vatican has offered no response to the Holy Father’s purported words. Assuming the accuracy of reports, they remain private, unofficial remarks that carry no magisterial weight and thus offer no theological change in Church teaching on human sexuality.

    • [A better response than Church Militant’s, which quickly dismisses the import of FrankenPope’s quote and moves on to other aspects of the issue]
      /
      ‘Gay Doesn’t Matter’ Remark Continues ‘Shadow Magisterium’
      /
      COMMENTARY: It would be better if comments reportedly made by the Pope in private remained in private, not splashed around the world by news media.
      /
      Father Raymond J. de Souza – 5/21/18
      /
      Pope Francis has pioneered a new form of papal teaching, massively influential but officially non-existent. It is something of a shadow magisterium, but on occasion it shines a brighter light than the official magisterium.
      /
      The latest example regards the nature of homosexuality. Juan Carlos Cruz, one of the Chilean sexual abuse victims who spent several days with Pope Francis in April, related the following from his conversations with the Holy Father about being gay.
      /
      “Juan Carlos, that you are gay doesn’t matter,” he said Francis told him. “God made you like this and loves you like this and it doesn’t matter to me. The Pope loves you like this, you have to be happy with who you are.”
      /
      We do not know of course what Pope Francis actually said, much less what he meant by it. The Holy See Press Office, as it customarily does when private conversations with Pope Francis are reported by his interlocutors, neither confirms nor denies what was said and reiterates that private conversations have no magisterial standing.
      /
      While they have no standing, such statements fly around the world instantly. That the Holy Father endorsed the view that a homosexual orientation is a positive good, desired and approved by God, is what was reported, broadcast, posted and tweeted around the world.
      /
      The Catechism of the Catholic Church makes three points about homosexuality: i) homosexual persons are created and loved by God and should be fully respected in their human dignity, ii) a same-sex orientation or attraction is “disordered” and therefore cannot be a positive good desired by God, and iii) that homosexual acts, like all sexual acts outside of marriage, are sinful.
      /
      Does Pope Francis disagree with that? That’s unlikely, as he has repeatedly said in regard to homosexuality that he follows the Catechism.
      /
      But it is a possibility, at least until it is demonstrated Juan Cruz is mistaken in his recollection, or that the Holy Father himself clarifies his meaning. But clarifications are not offered in such situations. Meanwhile, officially non-existent teaching becomes legitimate news, as it seems that the supreme pontiff is changing Catholic doctrine.
      /
      There have been at least five occasions in which Pope Francis has exercised this shadow magisterium to the effect of eclipsing Catholic teaching.
      /
      1. In April 2014, a woman in Argentina claimed that Pope Francis telephoned her and told her that, despite being in an invalid marriage, she should disregard the instructions of her pastor and receive Holy Communion in another parish.
      /
      2. In January 2015 Pope Francis telephoned a transgender man and reportedly told him something similar to what Cruz reported: “God loves all his children, however they are; you are a son of God, who accepts you exactly as you are. Of course you are a son of the Church!” Pope Francis invited the man and his fiancé to visit him in Rome.
      /
      3. Pope Francis has given several interviews to journalist Eugenio Scalfari, which are neither recorded nor transcribed. The Holy See Press Office insists that Scalfari’s subsequent reporting cannot be reliably be taken as the Holy Father’s words. Nevertheless, earlier this year headlines around the world trumpeted the latest from the shadow magisterium — that hell no longer exists.
      /
      On two occasions, the Holy Father gave public answers that were ambiguous, and seemed at odds with Catholic teaching.
      /
      4. In November 2015, addressing the Lutheran community in Rome, Pope Francis was asked by a Protestant woman if she could receive Holy Communion together with her Catholic husband. Absent extraordinary circumstances, that is not permitted. Pope Francis replied in a partly affirmative and partly negative way, advising the woman to “ask the Lord” and then proceed. It was widely reported that Pope Francis had given approval to intercommunion, which he had not.
      /
      5. Earlier this year, Pope Francis was asked by a tearful boy whether his late father was in heaven, despite being an atheist. Pope Francis did not answer a clear yes or no, but left the grieving boy with the impression that his father had been saved without faith. That too was widely reported.
      /
      In all of the above cases, the Holy Father is addressing an individual case, yet his words are reported as proposing a general norm. Absent any clarification of the norm, it is reasonably assumed by many that the norm has been changed.
      /
      It is a common enough pastoral reality. Any good pastor has offered comforting words of an ambiguous nature to a suffering individual. A grieving daughter is told by her pastor that her recently deceased father, who abandoned her mother for another woman, really did love his children. The pastor is not proposing that the father was right to do as he did, or that he will not face judgment for that. The pastor is, in the moment, choosing to emphasize part of the truth of the situation, rather than the whole.
      /
      That is why pastors are careful that such words are not proposed as formal teaching. It can be difficult enough in a parish, where the pastor is asked whether what he reportedly is to have said to so-and-so has changed the Church’s teaching or practice. That moment allows for a clarification. In the case of the Holy Father, there are no such moments; the whole world hears at the same time.
      /
      Indeed, those preparing the Holy Father’s visits should not have allowed the grieving child to ask the Pope about whether atheists are in heaven. It would have been awkward and out of place to examine what exactly is required for salvation. No one would find it easy to answer when the crying boy needed comforting, which the Holy Father immediately offered. He was not intending in such a moment to exercise his magisterium at all, shadow or otherwise.
      /
      It is commendable that the Holy Father has private conversations in which he offers pastoral care to those he meets. It would be better if those receiving such care would also respect the private nature of those conversations, not putting the Holy Father — and all who listen to him — in a difficult position.

Leave a Reply