FrankenPope, Protestants Belong To The Redeemed

FrankenPope, Protestants Belong To The Redeemed

Is FrankenPope changing doctrine again? – this time St. Cyprian of Carthage’s 3rd century teaching “Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus (No salvation outside the Church)” to “Extra Ecclesiam multa salus (Much salvation outside the Church)”! [Emphasis added] – AQ moderator Tom
en.news – 1/26/16

Pope Francis prayed on January 25 in an ecumenical vespers together with Lutherans, Anglicans, Methodists and other Christians.

At this event Francis referred to “differences [that] tear us apart” but then claimed “that we belong to the people of the redeemed, to the same family of brothers and sisters loved by the only Father.”

According to Catholic teaching Confession and Holy Eucharist are not an optional but necessary in order to be redeemed.

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3 comments on “FrankenPope, Protestants Belong To The Redeemed

  1. The final comment, true enough generally speaking, objectively omits fundamentals incumbent upon Catholics.
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    First: The act of faith is an absolutely necessary condition for membership in the Church. Normally, this is provided at infant Baptism via Catholic godparents. Yet, non-Catholics seeking membership and who have attained the age of reason must profess this act prior to being received and thereupon enabled to receive the Sacraments. Since Protestants deny the de fide dogma of the Church on Her status as THE ONE Church founded by Our Lord on St. Peter, any denial of the dogma must first be renounced and witnessed by the Church in some formal manner, save for cases in extremis and in which such is objectively impossible.
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    Second: there can be situations in which the only Sacraments to which Catholics may resort are Baptism and Matrimony. The example of secret Catholics in Japan discovered by missionary priests, after centuries of pagan dictatorship removed any and all priests by violent persecution, is one sterling example.
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    So, yes. The artcle’s point is most valid under most circumstances. However, as Trent taught, for certain and rare cases, God does provide a way for redemption outside the normal provisions but only in which extremity of need and the impossibility of receiving sacramental Baptism, Penance and/or Holy Communion are manifest.
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    Now, as one pope stated, such provisions exist based on the Will of God for salvation for each soul He creates. But they are not to be considered lightly nor in any sense to be simply expected.
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    Had Pope Francis explained that he would have served Catholics and heretics alike, and very well. But, of course, the ecumaniacal heresy seems to have trumped all other considerations and on went the show…

  2. Correction: my remark about an in extremis case refers only to one in which no clergy are able to hear a formal renunciation of a heresy. An interior act of perfect contrition and a desire to serve God as He wills to be served may be all an unfortunate but deeply sincere heretic or pagan in extreme need and holy desire “might” suffice, but the Church does not confirm what She cannot know with certainty.

  3. Second correction, with apologies for my prolixity. I meant that if a soul not formally a member of the Church receives the actual grace to seek redemption but is unable to be formally received and that soul accepts the grace and, at least interiorly but with a true act of his will, decides that he would be baptized, confess and avail himself of the other Sacraments befitting his state of life if it were possible, then the Church teaches that such an act of the will can and in some cases would merit both the mercy and justice of God Who holds out such hope to every soul who seeks Him. Thus, it would be God Himself acting directly in the absence of one of His ordained ministers or even a layman capable of baptizing another in extremis.
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    Again, such a case cannot usually be formally “certified” as it is via baptismal certificates or in parish records. However, its possibility remains even though it seems to be highly exceptional and most uncommon.

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