Pope Francis to journalists: Belief in God isn’t necessary, only honesty

Pope Francis to journalists: Belief in God isn’t necessary, only honesty

Posted by Paul Anthony Melanson on FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Francis just told journalists:

“The question here isn’t to believe in God or not. The question is to be or not to be honest with oneself and with others. This is the journalist’s job -we might say his mission too-: to get as close as possible to the truth and never to say or write anything that one knows, in his conscience, to be false.”

This isn’t the teaching of Vatican II’s Inter Mirifica:

3. The Catholic Church, since it was founded by Christ our Lord to bear salvation to all men and thus is obliged to preach the Gospel, considers it one of its duties to announce the Good News of salvation also with the help of the media of social communication and to instruct men in their proper use.

It is, therefore, an inherent right of the Church to have at its disposal and to employ any of these media insofar as they are necessary or useful for the instruction of Christians and all its efforts for the welfare of souls. It is the duty of Pastors to instruct and guide the faithful so that they, with the help of these same media, may further the salvation and perfection of themselves and of the entire human family. In addition, the laity especially must strive to instill a human and Christian spirit into these media, so that they may fully measure up to the great expectations of mankind and to God’s design.

4. For the proper use of these media it is most necessary that all who employ them be acquainted with the norms of morality and conscientiously put them into practice in this area. They must look, then, to the nature of what is communicated, given the special character of each of these media. At the same time they must take into consideration the entire situation or circumstances, namely, the persons, place, time and other conditions under which communication takes place and which can affect or totally change its propriety. Among these circumstances to be considered is the precise manner in which a given medium achieves its effect. For its influence can be so great that men, especially if they are unprepared, can scarcely become aware of it, govern its impact, or, if necessary, reject it.

5. It is, however, especially necessary that all parties concerned should adopt for themselves a proper moral outlook on the use of these media, especially with respect to certain questions that have been vigorously aired in our day.

The first question has to do with “information,” as it is called, or the search for and reporting of the news. Now clearly this has become most useful and very often necessary for the progress of contemporary society and for achieving closer links among men. The prompt publication of affairs and events provides every individual with a fuller, continuing acquaintance with them, and thus all can contribute more effectively to the common good and more readily promote and advance the welfare of the entire civil society. Therefore, in society men have a right to information, in accord with the circumstances in each case, about matters concerning individuals or the community. The proper exercise of this right demands, however, that the news itself that is communicated should always be true and complete, within the bounds of justice and charity. In addition, the manner in which the news is communicated should be proper and decent. This means that in both the search for news and in reporting it, there must be full respect for the laws of morality and for the legitimate rights and dignity of the individual. For not all knowledge is helpful, but “it is charity that edifies.”(1)

6. The second question deals with the relationship between the rights, as they are called, of art and the norms of morality. Since the mounting controversies in this area frequently take their rise from false teachings about ethics and aesthetics, the Council proclaims that all must hold to the absolute primacy of the objective moral order, that is, this order by itself surpasses and fittingly coordinates all other spheres of human affairs-the arts not excepted-even though they be endowed with notable dignity. For man who is endowed by God with the gift of reason and summoned to pursue a lofty destiny, is alone affected by the moral order in his entire being. And likewise, if man resolutely and faithfully upholds this order, he will be brought to the attainment of complete perfection and happiness.

Pope John Paul II, speaking to journalists, echoed this teaching:

“You are very concerned about freedom of information and of expression: you are right. Think yourselves lucky to enjoy it! Use this freedom well to grasp the truth more closely and to admit your readers, your listeners or viewers into “whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious”, to repeat the words of St Paul (Ph 4:8); into what helps them to live in justice and brotherhood, to discover the ultimate meaning of life, to open them up to the mystery of God, so near each of us.”

It is critical that journalists remain open to the order created by God. Yet Francis the Masonic Destroyer would have them believe that belief in God simply isn’t relevant to their vocation.

Francis is preparing the Church and the world for an age without Christ, for the reign of Antichrist.

Who will be able to resist the Antichrist when he reveals himself? – which could be at any time now. As I mentioned in a previous post, Romano Guardini has provided us with the answer:

“One day the Antichrist will come: a human being who introduces an order of things in which rebellion against God will attain its ultimate power. He will be filled with enlightenment and strength. The ultimate aim of all aims will be to prove that existence witout Christ is possible – nay rather, that Christ is the enemy of existence, which can be fully realized only when all Christian values have been destroyed. His arguments will be so impressive, supported by means of such tremendous power – violent and diplomatic, material and intellectual – that to reject them will result in almost insurmountable scandal, and everyone whose eyes are not opened by grace will be lost. Then it will be clear what the Christian essence really is: that which stems not from the world, but from the heart of God; victory of grace over the world; redemption of the world, for her true essence is not to be found in herself, but in God, from whom she has received it. When God becomes all in all, the world will finally burst into flower.”

Those who believe in their own intellectual prowess will succumb to the lie. They will be seduced by the Antichrist. Already we see the spirit of Antichrist seducing so many as they scramble to find teachers who will tickle their ears and tell them what they want to hear. But their end is destruction.

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
http://angelqueen.org/2016/09/25/pope-francis-to-journalists-belief-in-god-isnt-necessary-only-honesty/
Get AQ Email Updates
AQ RSS Feed

2 comments on “Pope Francis to journalists: Belief in God isn’t necessary, only honesty

  1. Am I missing something here? I thought that if you were completely honest, if you really sought after the full truth – you would have to end up with God. The only way you could end up not believing in God would be if somewhere along your path in the quest for truth you actually closed your eyes to truth. St Paul tells us that the whole of creation proclaims the glory of God.

    Why is it that some of the most un Christian, anti faith statements, I am hearing today are coming out of the mouth of our Pope?

  2. You know what , God does not like him very much either !

Leave a Reply