The Weight of one Holy Mass

This was in an insert of a church bulletin from St. Nicholas of Tolentine in Atlantic City, N.J. It was the first N.O. Mass I have seen done with so much reverence.
To say the church is beautiful, doesn’t do it justice, but it is in need of repair. It is a very small parish in a poor section of the city.
http://stnicholasoftolentineac.com/ You can also google images of it.
If you are ever near A.C. try and visit it. There is an extensive gift shop that is open everyday with many, many beautiful items. Also the pastor there, Msgr. William Hodge has (albeit reluctantly) recorded 3 CDs under the name of
the Singing Monsignor “ Between Ireland and Heaven”, “In Celebration of Christmas”, and “In Praise of Our Lady”.
Each is available at the church and gift shop for a 20.00 donation. You can also get them or individual MP3 files at Amazon. Also in there parish bulletin there is a note for Parish Electronic Transfers (I Don’t know if this works for outside donations) at www.stnicholasoftolentineac.com click on Donate then Parish Giving logo.
This church is on the National Historic Building List so I don’t think there can be much changes only restorations.
It is very, very beautiful and the priest needs help to restore it.
Well here is the insert: The Weight of One Holy Mass: The following was related to Sister Mary Veronica Murphy
by an elderly nun, who heard it from the lips of the late Reverend Father Stanislaus, SS.CC.
One day, many years ago, in a little town in Luxembourg, a Captain of the Forest Guards, was in deep conversation with the butcher, when an elderly women entered the shop. The butcher broke off the conversation to ask the old women what she wanted. She had come to beg for meat but had no money. The Captain was amused at the conversation which ensued between the poor woman and the butcher.
“Only a little ..>>
“But how much are you going to give me”
“I am sorry I have no money, but I’ll hear Mass for you.>>
Both the butcher and the Captain were very good men, but very indifferent about religion, so they both began to scoff at the old woman’s answer.
“All right, then,” said the butcher. “You go out and hear Mass for me, and when you come back, I’ll give you what the Mass is worth.
The woman left the shop and she returned later. She approached the counter and the butcher seeing her, said, “All right, then, we’ll see.”
He took a slip of paper and wrote on it, “I heard a Mass for you.” He then placed the paper on the scale ans a tine bone on the other side, but nothing happened. Next he placed apiece of meat instead of the bone, but still the paper proved heavier. Both men were beginning to feel ashamed of their mockery but continued their game. A large piece of meat was placed in the balanced, but still the paper held it’s own. The butcher,exasperated, examined the scales, but found hey were right.
What do you want, my good woman? Must I give you a whole leg of mutton?”
At this, he placed the leg of mutton on the balance, but the paper outweighed the meat. This so impressed the butcher that he was converted, and promised to give the woman her daily ration of meat.
As for the Captain, he left the shop a changed man, an ardent lover of daily Mass. Two of his sons became priests, one a Jesuit and the other a Father of the Sacred heart.
Father Stanislaus finished by saying, “I am the religious of the Sacred Heart, and the Captain was my Father.”
From that incident the Captain became a daily Mass goer and his children were trained to follow his example. Later, when his sons became priests, he advised them to offer Holy Mass well every day and never miss the Sacrifice through any fault of their own.

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3 comments on “The Weight of one Holy Mass

  1. Since I will always weigh in on the side of a priest’s admissions, especially when it involves his own father, I will not engage my usual cynical reaction to “everyday pious tales” (I do indeed believe some, but certainly not all) and accept this one – with true thanks!

    We need these reminders and I thank you, LP!

    : – )

  2. I believe that I had read this story before. But it wasn’t this priest’s father that was the Captain, he’s as Irish as Paddy’s pig and a longtime resident of this area. Didn’t mean to misrepresent where the tale came from.

  3. But that doesn’t change how important it is to go to mass.

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